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Brexit: Analysis and FAQs

 

“The University of Cambridge’s global reputation for excellence in academic achievement is only possible through the efforts of its teaching, research and administrative staff. We value the diversity and talent of our staff, and aim to make Cambridge the best place of work for people from across the globe. The University is committed to ensuring it remains a welcoming environment for its employees, wherever they are from.”

Prof Eilís Ferran, Pro-Vice-Chancellor for Institutional and International Affairs


Are there any changes to the immigration status of those currently working in or studying at Cambridge?

19 July 2016

According to an announcement from the Department of Business, Innovation and Skills (28 June 2016):

There will be no immediate changes following the EU Referendum, including in the circumstances of British citizens living in the EU, and European citizens living here. This includes those studying or working at UK universities.

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Will the UK continue to participate in the Erasmus programme?

19 July 2016

The UK Government has confirmed that while we remain in the EU we retain all our rights and obligations as a Member State, including the right to participate in Erasmus+.

According to a statement by the Erasmus+ national agency:

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Can I still apply for European Union research funding?

19 July 2016

According to a statement from the Department for Business, Innovation & Skills and Jo Johnson MP:

The referendum result has no immediate effect on those applying to or participating in Horizon 2020. UK researchers and businesses can continue to apply to the programme in the usual way. The future of UK access to European research and innovation funding will be a matter for future discussions.

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What will happen to my research proposal, which is currently under consideration?

19 July 2016

According to a statement from the Department for Business, Innovation & Skills and Jo Johnson MP:

The referendum result has no immediate effect on those applying to or participating in Horizon 2020. UK researchers and businesses can continue to apply to the programme in the usual way.

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I am currently funded by the European Union/European Research Council. What will happen to my funding?

19 July 2016

According to a statement from the Department for Business, Innovation & Skills and Jo Johnson MP:

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I'm an EEA national. What does the referendum mean for my status in the UK?

19 July 2016

The current political situation is uncertain and subject to change. To date the government has not taken any formal position as to the future status of EEA nationals living and working/studying in the UK. However, at present, the government has confirmed the following:

“The UK remains a member of the EU … until Article 50 negotiations have concluded.

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I’m a non-EEA national. Is there any impact on me?

19 July 2016

The referendum has no effect upon the UK immigration system and there no foreseeable changes to the mechanism by which non-EEA nationals can visit, study, work or settle in the UK.

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Can EEA nationals, and their family members, protect their current status in the UK?

19 July 2016

EEA nationals and their family members are not subject to UK immigration control and therefore, aside from applying for UK Citizenship, there is no other mechanism by which EEA nationals can formalise and protect their status in the UK. 

Under current EU legislation, EEA nationals and their family members have ‘free movement’ throughout all 28 EU states, which includes the UK. As noted above, at present these rights remain in place.

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What options do I have?

19 July 2016

As noted above, EU nationals do not need to register for any documentation in order to evidence their free movement rights in the UK, and it is important to note that obtaining EEA documentation currently does not give you any immediate protection.

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What options do my dependants have?

19 July 2016

Direct family members of EEA nationals have an automatic right of residence in the UK for as long as they remain the family member of that EEA national. The following are considered to be direct family members:

  • spouse or civil partner

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